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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2174/473

Title: Body fluid of the honey bee larva - I. Osmotic pressure, specific gravity, pH, O2 capacity, CO2 capacity, and buffer value, and their changes with larval activity and metamorphosis
Authors: Bishop, George H.
Issue Date: 1923
Citation: Bishop G.H., 1923. Body fluid of the honey bee larva - I. Osmotic pressure, specific gravity, pH, O2 capacity, CO2 capacity, and buffer value, and their changes with larval activity and metamorphosis. Journal of biological chemistry, vol.58, 543-565
Series/Report no.: Bures-B1402
Abstract: 1. Specific gravity of mature larvae of worker honey bees is 1.045. 2. The osmotic pressure of worker larval blood in terms of freezing point lowering gives a value of -0.86°C., and the osmotic pressure decreases during pupation. 3. The pH of larval blood (measured at 25°) is near 6.8, varying with conditions in the hive. 4. The oxygen capacity of larval blood is within a reasonable error the amount that could be physically dissolved, and no evidence of a chemical carrier is found. The content decreases during spinning, when the larva is enclosed in a cocoon, because diffusion is cut down while consumption increases. 5. CO2 absorption curves indicate that the blood (of drone larvae) decreases in CO2 capacity and content during spinning of the cocoon, but the tension of CO2 increases, and the H ion concentration increases, giving evidence of loss of alkali reserve through the production of acid other than CO2. After spinning, pupal blood shows a decrease of CO2 tension and content, with little change in capacity, allowing the pH to return to approximately the initial level. 6. Variation in CO2 tension and, therefore, in CO2 content and pH of blood from larvae in the same stage may be assigned to variable distribution of larvae in the cells of the comb, affecting diffusion of respiratory gases; but not appreciably to variation in the tension of CO2 in the air of the hive, which is maintained at a low and constant level. 7. The acidosis that occurs during spinning appears to be one of several factors present that should encourage autolytic changes in a tissue. Such changes do, in fact, take place in the bee larva. High concentration of the H ion may, therefore, be assigned as a contributing cause to the rapid metamorphosis of this insect.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2174/473
Appears in Collections:l'Abeille Digitale - Bee Archive / Prototype

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